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Molly’s dad was hoping to get Molly some experience in his new canoe and I just wanted to enjoy some lake time before winter really gets started. Molly got very little experience and after jumping out of the canoe twice, she got to spend the rest of the afternoon in the truck. Next time I won’t be along to distract her. There were quite a few ducks, some grebes, a couple of herons and an otter to provide entertainment as we enjoyed one of the last nice afternoons.

Two women, three dogs. Lots of fall colors.

Mid-October and the days were getting shorter. We managed to get in two short hikes to two beautiful lakes – Cutthroat and Blue. Next year I think we ought to add Ann and Rainy Lakes and have a four-lake day. I think this may have been the sixth or seventh time I went to Blue Lake in 2017. And I went to Cutthroat a few times in the last few months. Such pretty places and so close to home. I feel lucky.

Yellow is the dominant color. Soon it will be white.

Oh my gosh. I guess I was working a lot and got way far behind on my photos. This hike was to Twisp Pass at the end of September. My girls didn’t get to go since Sky was recuperating and it was a pretty long hike for Luna. She probably could have gone but it was best for her to keep Sky company. Lindsey and I saw a Golden Eagle and a mountain goat in the distance.

We have had a good long season of fall colors following the hot dry summer of 2017.

Honestly, this is my favorite hike. I’m pretty sure. We did it with Molly and Mary in August and you can see it here. It was very different in mid-October with another Mary, and Marcy and Gus and Guthrie too.

Near the end of the hike, I lingered in the sunshine, not ready to let this moment go. I was rewarded by a tiny pika¬†perched within ten feet of me. No doubt, this little guy was relishing the moment in the sunshine too. Pikas, the smallest members of the rabbit family, live in the harsh environment of talus (rock) slopes and they do not hibernate. During the warm months, they gather greens and make ‘hay’ piles, letting them dry before storing them in a dry place under the rocks, to consume during the LONG winter months.

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