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Alpine (also called subalpine) and western larches are conifer trees that are deciduous. Their needles change color and drop to the group each year. These trees put on magnificent shows of yellow and orange in the Cascades and other mountains. In some regions, they are referred to as tamaracks. Right now, the alpine larches are at the peak of their color and I’d suggest that you head for the high mountains and enjoy them for this brief moment of the year before winter really sets in.

The views were outstanding. Even the dogs were impressed. Maybe they were just impressed because it had been so long since they could get out and about. Any way you look at it, blue skies, changing colors, a smidge of new snow and fresh air all combined to make for a beautiful day.

The alpine larches have changed colors and they were so stunning, I am giving them their own blog post.

 

I received a notification that there might be northern lights/aurora borealis last night so was ready to stay out late in cool fall evening. Well, maybe I should have worn shoes instead of sandals because it was a stunning show – the best I’ve ever seen – and I was out later than I planned and my feet were freezing when I finally came inside. There may be more tonight. I will wear shoes.

A morning at the farmers’ market points out the fertility of our region. All the products at the Methow Valley Farmers’ Market in Twisp are produced in Okanogan County with most from the Methow Valley. And local artists are well represented too! So much amazing creativity and fertility.

These two have been together for nine years, engaged for four years; they’ve lived together and far apart, separated by jobs or school. They’ve lived in the northwest, the southeast, overseas. Their wedding was threatened by a not so distant wildfire. Mazama was on a level 1 alert which means, be ready, in case this fire blows up and moves closer to homes. Their home in Florida was threatened by Hurricane Irma. And yet, it all turned out. The fire cooperated and photos were made high in the mountains and the intimate morning wedding in Mazama went just as planned. Irma changed course. Sometimes it all works out.

They had considered having the entire event high in the mountains near Harts Pass however some family members were reluctant to drive the steep and windy road to the top. And with the potential fire danger, it was even scarier. Instead, they had it on the edge of a meadow at Mazama. Just the three of us drove to Harts Pass to catch the morning light and the beginning of fall colors in the alpine larch trees. Just yesterday, Harts Pass was closed to the public due to the continuing wildfire situation and Mazama is on Level 2 notice.

Since this was a morning wedding, we started early. The hair and makeup artist was there at 4:30 AM! I started working at 6. Have I mentioned that all weddings are unique? It’s true. That is something I love about them.

 

My website, Reflected Light Images continues to be a problem for me to fully update. Hopefully, this will be the last of my weddings to be posted here.

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