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Recently I made a short trip, without the girls, to Portland, 400 miles away. I left one day and returned the next. Why would I do that? Well, I have been on the search for a new camper trailer since last January. It turns out that 2020 was not the year to shop for an rv, or for that matter a puppy, a bicycle or a kayak. All are in big demand in the year of the covid. Our little tent trailer has served us well for ten years but since I like to travel on my own from time to time, I just wanted something newer that might be more reliable in the long run.

I found a more stout version of a tent trailer with nice size tires and clearance that will handle rough roads. It also has a furnace! Remember those times in Utah and New Mexico when the temperature hovered in the teens? Maybe now I can weather those long nights in comfort. It is only a year old and the previous owners said they used it just six times. They never did take it off paved roads.

My friend in Portland met me at a state park in the Columbia Gorge and pitched her tent on a rocky outcropping overlooking the big river. We enjoyed a nice walk in the morning before heading off in opposite directions.

We spent last week camped at Odlin Park on Lopez Island in the San Juan archipelago. The weather was mostly lovely with just one windy day and we were able to be on the water a fair amount. Sky got to try dock diving and Luna poked around the wrack line for smelly stuff, occasionally going in the water. We set crab traps, lost two of them on the windy day, and Ken fished (unsuccessfully) for salmon. We shared good food with good friends at our beachfront picnic table. The day we left, wildfire smoke from Oregon and California filled the air and we were ok with the end of the camping trip.

Summer is fleeting and soon it will be fall. Got to remember the warm days at the lakes.

This is the family we saw back in June. The youngster was still quite little then. Look here and scroll down til you see the little loon. Now it’s two and a half months old and nearly as big as its parents who are still feeding it. A banding crew caught it sometime during the summer and it is banded and scientists may be able to find it in the future and discover its migration route.

These images are from an August camping trip to the Okanogan Highlands.

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