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Category Archives: wildflowers

The girls and I, along with Red Molly went out on a new road the other day. It’s always fun to explore new places. It was good timing because the wildflowers were still quite nice. Of course, the mosquitoes were still quite numerous and hungry. A person just can’t stand still for long.

After our beach trip, we had to go to Virginia for the sad occasion of my father-in-law’s funeral. It was not an unexpected death but saying those final goodbyes is always difficult.

So with that, we were gone most of the month of June. As you might imagine we came home to lots of things that needed to be done and our dogs, who were well cared for in our absence. Molly was here for a long weekend while her family went to a wedding.

After suburban northern Virginia, it was incredible to be walking on our own hill with mostly peace and quiet.

The weather has been chilly and unsettled and there’s even been some rain. Mosquitoes are loving this. Loving it! They make it challenging to enjoy a walk in lots of my favorite places this time of year. If I stand still too long, the whining bugs are all around threatening to make me miserable.

The wildflowers are liking this weather too. Lots of color along the trails and by the lakes and streams. The same places that the mosquitoes like. Oh well. I’m glad for the flowers.

Yesterday was our sixth wedding anniversary! To celebrate, we hiked to our wedding spot and then on to Aspen Lake. It was a gloriously warm morning – we are finally getting nice weather. The wildflowers are at the peak of their bloom. Yes, it really was that vibrant. Bird song filled the air.

We have had some really marvelous warm spring weather in the last week or two. Temperatures into the 70’s and light to steady breezes quickly melted the snow and out of the wet ground sprouted delightful tiny wildflowers. Lots of insects hatched attracting lots of birds and the honey bees have been busy on the willow catkins, gathering pollen for their hives. For nearly a week I’d go outside a couple times a day and search for my former nemesis wildflower – steershead or Dicentra uniflora – and I was delighted to find it. As the snow line descended down into our draw, I found more and more of tiny plants with flowers the size of a dime. How could they have been here all these years and I never saw them til last year. Were they tucked under the bitterbrush that burned in 2014? Or did the fire stimulate seeds that may have laid dormant?

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